The Jayadratha Conundrum

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Word quickly rippled through both camps that Arjuna had vowed to kill Jayadratha on the morrow, failing which he would give up his weapons.

When Dronacharya first heard this, he was surprised. He didn’t believe his best pupil would make a pledge that rash. Secondly, why Jayadratha? The main architects of Abhimanyu’s death were the eight men that surrounded him and killed him mercilessly, breaking all rules, and attacking a young warrior from all sides, killing his charioteer and destroying his vehicle. The more Drona thought about it, the more he detected Krishna’s brilliant mind behind this proclamation.

Jayadratha was a relatively small fish for Arjuna. Arjuna could kill him in his sleep. Arjuna doesn’t have to use any of his prized weapons against him. There were many a weapon in Arjuna’s arsenal which, when used once, would be rendered useless. Krishna knew that the emotion of a lost child would drive Arjuna to rage. If he had learned that it was a pack consisting of Karna, Duryodhana and Drona who killed Abhimanyu, he would go after them with a vengeance. But it would be impossible to kill them all at the same time, even for Arjuna. There was still thousands of units of army still standing on the Kaurava side, protecting, and hiding these warriors. Using his precious weapons against them on these days would prove futile. They would be more effective, and likely hit their targets when interference was much less. Eliminating the lesser combatants, and killing off the multitude of armies would isolate the heavyweights, and they can be easily hunted down and butchered.

Drona admired Krishna’s game plan. For someone who made people believe he was a mere milkman, he was an astute commander, with advanced understanding on war games. For someone who said he wouldn’t pick up a weapon and only hold the reins to Arjuna’s chariot, he was virtually running the war entirely according to his plan.

Much like Krishna, Drona summoned the Kaurava astrologer as well to his camp that night. He, being a brahmin himself, had read the calendar. He knew about the celestial event the next day. He knew it was going to be a solar eclipse. They were discussing the exact time of the event when the guard announced that Duryodhana was arriving, with his brother-in-law in tow. Before he could send the scholar away, the Kaurava prince entered the chamber, ecstatic and in an obvious celebratory mood.

“I am sure you heard by now, acharya! All we need to do is ensure Jayadratha is protected and we have won this war. I have already made arrangements. Tonight, Jayadratha will quietly slip away and disappear into the darkness. I have instructed him to go and hide in Indraprastha. That is the last place they expect him to go. The Pandavas have spies along the routes to Hastinapura, and the Sindhu capital. But not Indraprastha. He will be safe there. And anyways, all he needs to do is hide his face to Arjuna until sunset tomorrow.”

“So the son-in-law of the mighty Kaurava king Dhritarashtra, the brother-in-law of the powerful Duryodhana, will disgracefully flee the battlefield in the middle of the night, like a lowly thief running away with his stolen wares. That is the legacy you want to leave behind for your future generations. That is how you want Draupadi to remember you. So be it”, said the wily acharya looking at the two brothers in law.

His words stung both of them. But they hurt Jayadratha more. The thought that the beautiful Draupadi, who may become his one day, would think of him as a coward, disturbed him. But he also knew that staying on the battlefield would mean certain death.

Drona read his mind and proceeded, “I have taught Arjuna everything he knows. I know his every move. Remember, it was my idea to isolate him from the Chakravyuha today to kill Abhimanyu. And we executed that plan to perfection. What makes you think we cannot protect him tomorrow? I have a plan in mind, which is why I called our astrologer over, to figure out exactly how many hours of sunlight we have tomorrow, and to give me an estimate of when sunset will happen tomorrow”

He looked at his scholar, who nodded, and did not contradict his statement.

“There is only one condition. Jayadratha has to stay alongside and behind me all day until sunset, and must not utter a word in anger. Arjuna may guess that Jayadratha is by me and attack my army. But he cannot defeat me. As long as Jayadratha keeps his head down, he is safe. At sunset, he is free to go his own way. Until then, he will be my shadow”

Duryodhana looked at Jayadratha, only half convinced. But Jayadratha made up his mind. For the sake of the woman he craved, he was going to risk death than retreat like a coward. “I will stay with you”, he concluded decisively.

Drona nodded and repeated, “Remember, no matter what, do not let your position be known. No emotional outbursts, no overt celebrations, and no blowing of the conch until I say it is sunset”

As they trudged off, Drona looked at his scholar with a blank expression. The astrologer looked back into the acharya’s eyes. He wanted to say something, but decided not to. He picked up his parchments and left, with the sound knowledge that the war would end soon.

Continued here

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