The Immortal

Continued from here

Abhimanyu writhed as the arrows pierced his body armor and disabled him. The pain shot through his legs, traveling rapidly through the veins, and affected his ability to aim. His next arrow, which he meant for Duryodhana’s flag post, missed its target. But the power and skill of this young man was such that the arrow hit and downed the flag post of Brihadbala, who was right behind Duryodhana in the secondary circle. Brihadbala, a direct descendant of Rama, seethed in anger at this insult.

The flag of a warrior was his signature, his pride. Men poured their heart and soul into designing their flag. A powerful flag was a statement. A mighty flag drover fear into opponents hearts. Many times, a superhero warrior won wars by just turning up with his flagged chariot, without having to draw a weapon.

Brihadbala forgot all about rules, and raced towards the wounded Abhimanyu, going past Duryodhana and wanting to finish off this brash Pandava youngster. He realized his mistake as soon as his chariot went past the Kaurava’s. The arrow cut his reins, separating his horses from their payload, and Brihadbala tumbled down, out of balance. But he quickly got up on his feet, grabbed his sword, and charged at Abhimanyu.

Abhimanyu assessed his situation. Both his legs were shot, but he could still move. After the initial shock, his mind quickly recovered and focused. He knew he had limited mobility. He had to use his supreme archery skills to keep the enemy at bay. He had all his weapons close by. He also looked at his chariot, and made a mental assessment of all the pieces he could use as weapons. He saw the approaching Brihadbala, sword in hand. He picked up his bow and drew the arrow back, aiming to cut the sword in two. But before he could release his arrow, his bow was broken. Dusshasana, shooting from behind Abhimanyu’s back and taking advantage of his immobility, wickedly laughed as he hurled a spear, leaving Abhimanyu’s weapon of choice ineffective.

This was a well planned, and well-orchestrated attack. Although Duryodhana personally wanted to kill Abhimanyu, he knew that a single assassin would sign his own death warrant. Arjuna would effect such a vengeance on the killer that half the Kaurava army would be demoralized just thinking about it. Duryodhana wanted every one to have equal part in killing this kid, so that Arjuna’s wrath could be dispersed, and hence contained.

Abhimanyu moved slowly and painfully. His feet felt like they were tied to a rock. But his abilities weren’t diminished. He swung around, turning his back to the marauding Brihadbala, picked up a spear from his chariot, and in a single swoop heaved it at his attacker. The spear twirled its way in the air and cracked through Brihadbala’s armor, ripping his ribs apart. He gasped for air and stumbled. Not wanting to waste another weapon on this dying man, Abhimanyu left him alone, to the horror of the enemies surrounding him.

Dusshasana decided it was time to end this. The longer this child was alive, the more damage he would cause. He rushed towards him, bow and arrow aimed at Abhimanyu’s chest. Abhimanyu watched intently, his eyes concentrating on every movement of Dusshasana. When the arrow released, he cut it down with his sword, inches from his body. He picked up the flag staff from broken his chariot and hurled it into Dusshasana’s chariot wheels. His left wheel shattered, Dusshasana tumbled off the chariot, losing his balance. He fell within a few feet of Abhimanyu. Abhimanyu smiled and tightened his grip on his sword. He saw fear in Dusshasana’s eyes. He picked up his sword in his right hand, and a spear in his left hand. But he didn’t act. “I won’t kill you, uncle. Your death is pre-ordained in someone else’s hands”

Shalya quickly rode up and rescued Dusshasana, mounting him onto his own chariot and driving away to safety. Shalya knew if he stayed around, he would certainly die. So he ran away.

Kritavarma, who all this while had been only taunting Abhimanyu without attacking him, moved slowly towards him. He felt guilty of being part of this conspiracy. But he had to fulfill his duty. He didn’t want to kill Abhimanyu; only disable him further. If he can drive a few arrows into Abhimanyu’s armor and disappear, he can look his Yadava clan in the eye. But before he could act, Abhimanyu had picked up Dusshasana’s mace and swung it at his chariot. Kritavarma barely avoided being smashed in the skull. The mace broke his bow and smashed his flagstaff, causing the horses to lose control and run wildly away.

Karna and Duryodhana decided to attack together. With more of their original warriors running away or disabled, the band of attackers ran the risk of dispersing, leaving Abhimanyu alive. But at this point, leaving him alive was not an option. They knew they broke the rules. If they left him alive, he would come back tomorrow, or the day after, and annihilate them. He had to die.

The two friends released several arrows in Abhimanyu’s direction, who expertly dodged or smashed them, all the while standing in a single spot. His concentration and skills amazed everyone around him. Soldiers stopped fighting and watched this spectacle. Other generals, mounted on elephants and horses, put down their weapons and gaped at this drama. Deep inside, several of them rooted for this young warrior, who refused to give up, and was fighting till his last breath.

Abhimanyu picked up his mace and swung it hard in Duryodhana’s direction. The mace smashed his chariot’s box, and all his weapons fell out, including his own mace. Helpless, Duryodhana instructed his charioteer to charge at Abhimanyu. Abhimanyu picked up the broken axle of his own chariot and slung at Duryodhana’s chariot. His wheel broke, and the chariot tilted on its side, riding on its axle. The charioteer immediately swung away from the fight, knowing if he got any closer Duryodhana would probably die at Abhimanyu’s hands

Karna, Drona and Kripacharya couldn’t believe their eyes. Karna instructed Shalya’s brother Rukmartha to attack Abhimanyu from the front. He circled around, looked at both Drona and Krupa and told them to wait for his signal. As Rukmartha approached, Abhimanyu, now short of weapons, picked up the wheel of his own chariot. He picked it up with both hands and began twirling it around above his head, like a chakra. Seeing the opportunity, Karna, Kripa and Drona shot their arrows, releasing them in quick succession.

Abhimanyu released the wheel. It spun viciously and cracked Rukmartha’s skull. But right at that moment, three arrows stuck him from three of the greatest warriors on that field. And then three more.

The six arrows slit his chest plate and armor, piercing through his skin and drilling deep gashes in his body. As he fell back, three more arrows were released. This time, the arrows went deeper, cutting through his ribs and coming out on the other side. Think crimson fluid dripped from the arrow tips, as this boy faced warrior fell to the ground.

He landed on his back with a thud. His body went into a shock. He legs shuddered for a few moments before he lost sensation in them. His right hand, which gripped his dagger as he was falling, loosened. His vision became cloudy. He saw the clear blue sky. He remembered Virata, and his first encounter with Uttara. He felt nothing but her soft skin on his cheek. He heard nothing but her sweet voice by the creek.

And then her beautiful face filled in, as he closed his eyes

Continued here

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