The Brother-in-Law Blockade

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Drishtadyumna and his army raced after Abhimanyu, knowing that he needed their support. The swirling circle was still intimidating. He beckoned Satyaki to join him. As the two companies raced past the first bands of Chakravyuha, they realized they needed reinforcements. A quick sound of the conch brought Sahadeva and his army. A strong contingent of almost ten thousand men went after Abhimanyu. Before advancing further, Drishtadyumna gave instructions to Yudhishtira and Nakula to attack the circle from the west.

They cleared the first circle and just caught a glimpse of Abhimanyu’s chariot slice through the Kaurava army. They raced further, Bheema’s chariot crushing foot soldiers by the dozen as he and Drupada’s mighty son headed to bolster Krishna’s nephew. They were about to catch up with Abhimanyu when they saw that man, smiling wickedly, circling villainously with thousands of soldiers in tow. Jayadratha’s chariot was painted dark grey, with gold adornments. On its mast flew a black flag with a jackal as its symbol. His bow was painted red, and each of his arrows in all the quivers were black. His horses were all dark purple. If there was a wickedness personified on that field, it was him.

He was an expert in the positions of Chakravyuha. He didn’t have the courage to break it, or the acumen to break out of it. But he had a phenomenal memory. He knew every inch of the formation. He could memorize in seconds thousands of positions and their references. That gave him an advantage today. He wanted to kill the Pandavas today. He had wanted to, from the day they defeated him when he abducted the dark beauty Panchali. Oh how he wanted her. She was breathtakingly beautiful, with a body to die for. He would have given her all the comforts. She needn’t have spent thirteen years wandering around like a tramp. He could’ve made her the queen, if she wanted. Even in the middle of this war, the thought of her brought out the animalistic lechery in him. He hated the Pandavas. They had what he couldn’t. And they insulted him. They defeated him. They threatened to cut off his head, but left him alive because he was Jayadratha. Bheema’s words reverberated in his ears, “You are very lucky. You are the husband of the one person in the entire Kaurava clan that we love. And we cannot bring a tear to her eye. Take this as your one chance towards life. Next time, we won’t be so forgiving”. Jayadratha seethed within. He, a man, a warrior, a king, captured by these bandits. They said he owed his life to a woman. The insult!

He shot a barrage of arrows towards the approaching company. Satyaki was taken aback. “These arrows are from Jayadratha?”, said he, and quickly shot a glance towards Dristhtadyumna. The Pandava commander raced his chariot in the direction of Jayadratha. He had a score to settle as well. This scum of the earth abducted his sister. Drishtadyumna could’ve cut his throat if he were around. He hurled two spears in the direction of Jayadratha’s chariot, hoping to smash the chariot’s wheels and disable him. To his surprise, Jaydratha shot to arrows in quick succession, cutting both the spears in half. Drishtadyumna wondered, “where did he acquire this skill?”. Jayadratha then went on the offensive, he and his sizable army killing scores of cavalrymen and foot soldiers around the two Pandava warriors, exposing them. Drishtadyumna and Satyaki, unable to contain him, quickly pulled back and headed in a different direction.

Jayadratha then headed west. He instructed his charioteer to keep circling, but he himself found an elephant to mount. He wanted the advantage of height, to disable, and possibly capture Yudhistira. His army of elephants and cavalry raced towards Yudhistira. The eldest Pandava was amazed at the sight of an army of elephants rushing towards him. Up to the fight, he picked up a quiver full of arrows and instructed his charioteer to scythe through the giant animals. The charioteer does as was told. But as he approached the wall of elephants, he realized there was no way he could go past them, and that any attempt at bravery could crush the chariot. He turned and went lateral. Yudhishtira was furious, but soon realized the charioteer was right. He was beginning to get worried. He couldn’t break the wall. On the other side, was a solo youth, engaging fierce warriors in a treacherous battle.

What would happen if…

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